Elizabeth Montagu
and the Bluestocking Circle
         is Funded by the AHRC
 
 

Special Issue of Women's Writing:

Volume 21

The Material Culture of Eighteenth-century Women’s Writing

Issue 3, 2014


Guest Editor: Caroline Franklin

Please click on the links below to Access information on related projects, institutions and organisations:

 

North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers

 

The Mining Institute, a registered charity, promote the important historical achievements of engineering in the mining industry and are situated in the heart of Newcastle upon Tyne and housed in Neville Hall, a Grade II* listed building.

 

The Institute plays a pivotal role in the dissemination of the information relative to problems concerning geotechnical and extractive industries; upholding its international reputation and status as the world centre of mining - long after coals have been carried from Newcastle.

 

Aberdeen University Library

 

The Library, on four sites over three campuses, is one of the largest and best equipped in Scotland, offering excellent resources to support your studies. The University Library (arts, science, education and social sciences) including the Special Collections Centre, the Taylor Library and European Documentation Centre (law with official UK and EU publications) are on the Old Aberdeen campus. The Medical Library on the Foresterhill Campus covers the Medicine and Medical Sciences disciplines, while the Reid Library at the Rowett Institute for Nutrition and Health focuses mainly on nutrition, both human and animal.

 

The libraries hold over 1 million volumes, with most easily accessible through the online catalogue. In addition to ancient papyri and archives, the libraries also offer access to thousands of books and millions of journal articles in electronic format on the web. One collection, for example, has over 40,000 recently published e-books in full text from top quality academic publishers. These resources can be accessed both on and off campus so you can study at your convenience anytime, anywhere.

 

Longleat House Archives

 

The collections at Longleat include the libraries and archives assembled by the Thynne family since (and even slightly before) Longleat was purchased by Sir John Thynne in the 1540s. The archive includes material from the early Middle Ages to the present day and is still actively used in the management of the House, collections, grounds and estate. Books in the libraries range from early medieval manuscripts to 19th and 20th-century children's books, from incunables to Sir Winston Churchill first editions.

Many of the best known documents in the collection have been published in microfilm editions and are readily available in public collections: editions of the Carteret Papers, the Coventry Papers, the Devereux Papers, the Dudley Papers (partial edition only), the Portland Papers, the Prior Papers, the Seymour Papers, the Talbot Papers, the first series of the Thynne Papers, the Whitelocke Papers and many of the class of Miscellaneous Manuscripts have so far been published, as well as an edition of the Glastonbury Abbey court and compotus rolls.

 

John Rylands Library

 

The University of Manchester Library is one of only five National Research Libraries. With more than 4 million printed books and manuscripts, over 41,000 electronic journals and 500,000 electronic books, as well as several hundred databases, the library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the country.

 

The British Library

 

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest libraries. The collections include more than 150 million items, in over 400 languages, to which three million new items are added every year. The Library house books, magazines, manuscripts, maps, music scores, newspapers, patents, databases, philatelic items, prints and drawings and sound recordings.

 

The Huntington Library

 

The Library’s collection of rare books and manuscripts in the fields of British and American history and literature is nothing short of extraordinary. For qualified scholars, The Huntington is one of the largest and most complete research libraries in the United States in its fields of specialization. For the general public, the Library has on display some of the finest rare books and manuscripts of Anglo-American civilization. Altogether, there are about 6 million items


Historic Swansea Homepage

 

This website offer information on the cultural and literary history of Swansea with maps, pictures and stories of Swansea’s past Historic Swansea is a gateway to learn of a town steeped in history.

 

The Dylan Thomas Homepage

 

This site is intended to promote Dylan's poetry and prose for both enjoyment and educational purposes. You'll find a full chronology of Dylan's life which is illustrated with quotes from his work, plus information on Dylan's "craft or sullen art", and literature written about him.

  

Women's Studies Group Homepage

 

The Women's Studies Group: 1558-1837 is a small, informal multi-disciplinary group formed to promote women's studies in the early modern period and the long eighteenth century. The group was established to enable those interested in women's studies to keep in touch with each other, to hear about members' interests and relevant publications, and to organise regular meetings and an annual workshop where members can meet and discuss women's studies topics. The WSG membership is open to men and women, graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars. The group meets in Stewart House, University of London, on Russell Square, W1.

 

Mary on The Green Project

 

Despite the significance of Mary Wollstonecraft's life and work, there has never been a public memorial statue of her anywhere in the world. The location of her home on Newington Green in North London, where her radical ideas about women's equality, education and politics were first formed, seems a logical place for a permanent memorial to such an important and influential woman. Through public and private funding, a dedicated group of Mary Wollstonecraft enthusiasts and local area supporters are planning to commission a sculpture that will be erected in a prominent area of the green. There will be open competition for sculptors, following which interested members of the public will be invited to comment. It is hoped that the unveiling will take place in the spring of 2013.

The project is being spearheaded by the Newington Green Action Group (NGAG), a registered charity (#1087866) that was formed in 1997 to revitalise the green and the surrounding area. This award-winning group completed the revitalisation of Newington Green in 2005 and now endeavours to maintain the improvements and support further development work of benefit to the community.

There are instructions on the website on how you can show your support and get involved.

 

The National Portrait Gallery Website

 

This website offers access to the national gallery that was founded in 1856 to collect portraits of famous British men and women. Explore over 160,000 portraits from the 16th Century to the present day.

 

The Victoria and Albert Museum Website

 

This large and interactive website details activities, exhibits and events at the museum, the world's largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects. Its collection spans 5,000 years of art, from ancient times to the present day, in virtually every medium, from the cultures of Europe, North America, Asia and North Africa. 

 

N.paradoxa; International Feminist Art Journal

 

Founded in 1998, n.paradoxa publishes scholarly and critical articles highlighting feminist art and feminist art theory written by women critics, art historians and artists on and in relation to the work of contemporary women artists post-1970 (visual arts only) working anywhere in the world. Each thematic volume in print contains artists and authors from more than 10 countries in the world and explores their work in relation to feminist theory and feminist art practices.

Follow the above link to the KT Press website, the publishers of N.Paradoxa.

 

The Association of Documentary Editing


The Association for Documentary Editing was created in 1978 to promote documentary editing through the cooperation and exchange of ideas among the community of editors.

One of the prime motivations behind the formation of the ADE was to create a forum for exchanging ideas and setting standards that reflect the ADE's commitment to the highest professional standards of accuracy of transcription, editorial method, and conceptual indexing.

 

The Johnson Society of London

 

The Society, which was founded in 1928, is made up of people with interests in the life and work of Samuel Johnson, his circle and his times. We welcome all who share these or similar interests. We have members in many parts of the world in addition to the UK, including Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the USA. 

The Society holds seven meetings each year. In recent years, there have been papers on such topics as Johnson on the theatre and on Shakespeare, The Rambler, the Dictionary, Irene, and the Life of Pope. More general subjects have been the Bluestockings, the eighteenth century response to miracles, and the moral responsibility of the novelist. Such figures as James Boswell, Fanny Burney, Richard Sheridan and Samuel Richardson have been considered. Speakers have included David Fairer on Thomas Warton, David Nokes on Swift and on Gay, Conor Cruise O'Brien on Burke and Roy Porter on Hogarth. Philip Howard, Richard Ingrams, Christopher Ricks, P D James, Beryl Bainbridge and Boris Johnson have also addressed the Society.


Dr Johnson's House 

 

Dr Johnson's House is a charming 300-year-old townhouse, nestled amongst a maze of courts and alleys in the historic City of London.  Samuel Johnson, the writer and wit, lived and worked here in the middle of the eighteenth century, compiling his great Dictionary of the English Language in the Garret.

Today, the House is open to the public with a collection relating to Johnson, a research library, restored interiors and a wealth of original features. Often described by visitors as a hidden gem, 17 Gough Square is a tranquil spot in the midst of the bustling City.

 

The Voices and Books Network

 

Voices and Books, 1500-1800 is an AHRC network of early modern scholars (literary scholars, linguists, historians, musicologists) and partners (British Library; City Library, Newcastle; National Early Music Association UK; The Reading Experience Database; Seven Stories) who are committed to recovering the history of reading aloud and listening to books. We want to establish the ubiquity of this practice, but also understand how the voicing of scripted text structured different communities and practices of sociability.

 

The Reading Experience Database (UK RED)

 

The UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) is an open access database and research project housed in the English Department of the Open University. It is the largest resource recording the experiences of readers of its kind anywhere. UK RED has amassed over 30,000 records of reading experiences of British subjects, both at home and abroad, and of visitors to the British Isles, between 1450 and 1945.


Creative Communities, 1750-1830


Creative Communities, 1750-1830 is an AHRC-funded Research Network based in the School of English at the University of Leeds, in partnership with the University of Southampton and University College London. Dr David Higgins is the Principal Investigator and Professor John Whale is the Co-Investigator.

Focusing on historical case studies, the network examines how connections between members of a community, and between different communities, can enhance creativity. At the same time, it subjects those key terms to rigorous investigation. The network brings together established and early career researchers, as well as non-academic stakeholders, from a range of institutions, to debate key questions about the relationship between creativity and community.


Women's Early Modern Letters Online {WEMLO} 

WEMLO is a British Academy/Leverhulme-funded project created to support researchers of early modern women letter writers. This site provides a scholarly meeting place for such researchers and offers an array of resources, including bibliographies, links to related resources, an image gallery of female letter writers, calls for papers, news, and a blog where scholars can communicate with each other about their work. The project also holds workshops that encourage scholarship in the area of early modern women’s epistolary culture.

The digital resource we are creating–the WEMLO catalogue–is an open-access union catalogue and editorial interface offering descriptions of women’s letters from c.1400-1700. As a sister resource to EMLO (Early Modern Letters Online) created by the University of Oxford’s Mellon-funded “Cultures of Knowledge” project, WEMLO will be integrated into the permanent digital offerings of the Bodleian Libraries.

King's College London Centre for Enlightenment Studies

The Centre for Enlightenment Studies at King’s was created to consolidate and give a higher profile to the existing 18th century research strengths across the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, drawing on a range of expertise in the fields of literature, cultural and intellectual history, music, languages and philosophy.

We welcome collaboration with all who share an interest in the concept of ‘Enlightenment’, including those who are critical of it and those who work outside the 18th century.

The Centre aims to build upon existing links with the capital’s major cultural institutions in developing new areas of research and to place a new focus oninter-departmental initiatives and collaborations at research level.



 
 
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Bluestocking Circle

The Bluestocking Circle was a group of writers, artists and thinkers who met in the London homes of Elizabeth Montagu, Elizabeth Vesey and Frances Boscawen. These fashionable hostesses invented a new kind of informal sociability and nurtured a sense of intellectual community. The term "bluestocking" evolved from the scholar Benjamin Stillingfleet's decision to abandon formal evening dress and obey Vesey's call to "Come in your blue stockings." Guests included the leading literary, political and cultural figures of the day, including Elizabeth Carter, Samuel Johnson, Edmund Burke, David and Eva Garrick and later Hannah More and Frances Burney.

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